Monumental Acrylic Works

Flora Doehler, my artist friend of Our Bear River Adventure fame, sent me a link from COLOURlovers. I was delighted to be reminded about this vibrant site because, with so many links to explore, I had not visited this one for a while. Flora directed me, especially, to the work of Brazilian artist Delson Uchôa.

The first thing that struck me is the scale in which he works. The amount of time, dedication and vision required to paint and attach the various elements together for any given work is enormous. It is no wonder that most of his works take years to complete. They also include some startling methods for achieving his vision. Xadrez de Chão, for instance, “is the result of a years-long process that included covering with resin the whole interior of his house, painting it, and finally peeling off the painting.”  (Charta Art Books)

As Uchôa puts it:

I’m interested in the wear and tear of circulation, the signs of the passage of time, the scratches on the furniture… The dwelling of the painting and all the elements that compose it.

His methods are particularly appealing to me because of his sheer love of design, and the ways he plays with acrylics to realize those designs. I am in love with acrylic. Perhaps it would be more accurate to say that I love what acrylic products can do. Watching him work is absolutely fascinating, as is his multi-layered approach, utilizing acrylic on canvas, resin and coagulated acrylic on cellophane (see Cambios). Pushing pieces into pockets, applying different elements that he seemingly tosses onto the work~then adheres, pouring, splattering, painting grids and lines, can all be witnessed on the first part of the video.

Diptico Basculante ~ by Delson Uchôa

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Diptico Basculante ~ detail

designboom describes Uchôa’s paintings as:

. . . characterized by the use of acidic, noisy colors, an illuminated, vibrant palette that leads the public’s gaze across highly elaborate surfaces, produced by an obsessive accumulation of gestures, decals, collages and many layers of paint and synthetic varnishes. They are structured around formal principles that are a legacy of the constructivist-concrete tradition, incorporating motifs and techniques taken from folk decoration, lace, embroidery and weaves that result in optical effects and fields.

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Flamboyant ~ by Delson Uchôa

Luciana Brito Galeria is hosting a Uchôa exhibition from June 30 to  July 31,  2009.  Art critic Paulo Herkenhoff portrays Uchôa’s works as “celebrations of color by way of paintings with monumental dimensions, which are not appreciated only through one’s eyes, but with one’s entire body.”

In them, transparency, luminosity, texture, chromatic exploration and scales are interrelated .  .  .

Displayed in ways that make them seem to be springing off the wall or falling on the floor, the artworks embrace the spectator, who also becomes a participant. By their wealth of details, texture and size, these artworks beckon for the viewer’s touch, which the artist often allows.

Varal ~ by Delson Uchôa

I would certainly enjoy the sensations involved in touching a Uchôa painting. A step ladder would have to be involved; a bucket truck would be even better, unless I was lucky enough to be invited to a lawn party where his works were spread out on the grass.

https://i0.wp.com/www.equipmentready.com/upload/products/large/THUMB_56079.jpg

On the other hand, to experience a Uchôa method first hand, I could simply apply resin and paint over everything in my home, and start peeling!

Would anyone care to join me in this challenge?

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About CarolWiebe

Art entices, inspires, and delights me. Art is a vehicle for laughter, tears, wonder, enlightenment--taking me on a constant path of discovery. You can't say that about housework (except, perhaps, for the crying part).
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